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Grey phalarope in Dorset: what your tweets tell us ...

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  • A vagrant species that occasionally turns up on the coast of Dorset in winter.


     

     

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The grey phalarope is one of those scarce waders that will probably turn up in Dorset in very small numbers each autumn. An arctic breeding species it travels vast distances during the winter as it wanders over the oceans and those that are seen on land in autumn and winter are probably those blown off course by storms. Only a very small number are seen in Britain each year and a very small number of those might be seen in Dorset. The RSPB Handbook of British Birds says that the non-breeding birds leave the breeding grounds in June, the females in July and the males and young leave in September and October and it is likely to be the latter group that encounter autumn storms and end up here for a while.

The weekly reporting by tweets of sightings of grey phalarope would seem to paint a quite clear picture of first sightings being in week 36 in late September, peaking in week 38 at the beginning of October and then falling to week 42 in late October. Outside of this there are odd records from week 32, possibly a female, and also from week 46 to 48 in November and these sightings may well be weather related. It seems that by the end of November they have all moved further south and are less likely to be blown ashore here in bad weather.

The distribution maps shows that the Lyme Bay coast from Lyme Regis to Portland Bill is by far the most likely place for them to turn up although some appear in Poole Harbour and Christchurch Harbour. The swannery at Abbotsbury report the most but this is, of course, a closely watched area but equally the conditions along the Fleet obviously suit them; their port in a storm!

For grey phalarope on your Dorset list you need to be ready to go as soon as a report of sightings comes in.


 

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This chart shows the number of reports per week for this species where there are reports (see note below):

The intention of this chart is to show which weeks during the year this species is most likely to be seen. See note above about multiple reports of a single specimen!

This chart shows the number of reports per month for this species where there are reports (see note below):

The intention of this chart is to show which months during the year this species is most likely to be seen. Remember that is is the total number of REPORTS; there may be several reports for just one occurrence of the species (that is to say, a number of individuals may have been to see a single specimen of a species).

This chart shows the number of reports for each year for this species where there are reports (see note below):

Contributors to the Nature of Dorset have seen this species at these locations:

Please note that the markers show APPROXIMATE locations of the observation, not exact locations! You can find often find out more information about location by looking at the original tweet. Click on any marker to see the name of the location and then click on the location name to see more details about the site where available.

This chart shows the number of reports per site for this species. Hover over any column to see the site and the number of reports:

Ckick/tap the list icon for an alphabetical list of all the posts in this series from where you can access any that are of interest to you

Name Peter Orchard
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Twitter Screen Name peterorchardnod
Location Wareham, Dorset, UK
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This is a feed of contributions to my main website; the Nature of Dorset. My 'high five' are the five most interesting species from my walks in Dorset somewhere

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